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What is it?

The way learning content is presented to learners. Possibilities include in-person, lecture, digital, electronic, synchronous, asynchronous, and more.

Why is it important?

Delivery mode is important because the right delivery mode can help showcase content more effectively and facilitate learning and retention. While it is often considered a static concept that is either a designated location or type of technology, delivery mode is neither static nor one size fits all. Instead, the delivery mode should be chosen based on what is to be learned and the needs of the learners. Delivery mode can also be combination of two or more modes, often referred to as taking a blended approach.

Why does a business professional need to know this?

Business professionals need to have an understanding of delivery modes so they can work with learning and development professionals to select the best delivery mode(s) for their needs. Factors to consider when selecting a delivery mode include:

  • Business reasons for requiring learners to complete training
  • Who the learners are, e.g., new staff or experienced staff
  • The learners’ current skill levels
  • Available resources, including people, budget, and time
  • How soon the learning needs to become a part of the learners’ routine
  • Size of the learner population
  • Aspects of existing training that are no longer relevant or effective
  • Nature of the content, e.g., completely new or a refresher
  • Complexity of the content
  • How learner proficiency will be evaluated, e.g., quizzes, proficiency tests, timed drills, observation, problem solving, and so forth.

Knowing the responses to these considerations can help you or your instructional designer assess how best to present the content. Methods for presenting content include the following:

  • Demonstration
  • Distance learning, whether synchronous or asynchronous
  • eLearning
  • Hands-on learning
  • Informal learning
  • Lecture
  • Lab
  • Job aids or performance support tools, e.g., labeled images, checklists, or step-action tables
  • Projects, e.g., individual or group
  • Peer mentoring and coaching
  • Microlearning modules
  • Simulation, whether on the job or using augmented or virtual reality
  • Social learning
  • Solving problems or resolving challenges
  • Video, e.g., tutorial, scenario, simulation, or interactive video

References

About John Vivolo

Photo of John Vivolo

For nearly 20 years, John Vivolo has dedicated his career to online learning. His experience includes being an instructor, instructional designer, educational technologist, director of an award-winning online learning unit at New York University (NYU) and, more recently, executive director at the Katz School of Science and Health. John is currently all-but-dissertation in the EdD program at Northeastern University.

Term: Delivery Mode

Email: johnvivolo@yahoo.com

Twitter: @vivolojohn

LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/johnvivolo/

What is it?

Any sequence of planned activities or experiences that enables learners to explore materials, practice what they have learned, and achieve proficiency.

Why is it important?

Central to all learning experiences, a curriculum provides the core structure that guides learners on their path to meet set goals. In other words, a curriculum helps learners learn by creating a framework that communicates performance standards, key learnings, methods, projects, relevant metrics, evaluation plans, etc.

Why does a business professional need to know this?

Imagine trying to assemble a structure without a cohesive plan. Yes, it is possible to build something, but how will you measure progress along the way? And how will you be able to recreate what was built later?

Creating a curriculum is creating a plan that lays out a set of expectations to help learners build towards their goals. The curriculum might include a sequence of courses, internships, mentorships, coaching sessions, or immersive simulations that, in essence, serve as the building blocks of learning.

Establishing a curriculum, in alignment with business or educational goals, provides a roadmap that enables learners to progress along learning pathways in support of their own or organizational growth. Alignment also enables learning leaders to invest in the future of their people in the organization and report to stakeholders on how their educational programs support the mission and vision of the organization.

References

About Bryan Alexander

Photo of Bryan Alexander

Bryan Alexander is an education and technology futurist. A senior scholar at Georgetown University, he helps colleges, universities, libraries, non-profits, and governments think about where education may be going in the coming decades. Creator of the Future of Education Observatory, Bryan publishes the monthly FTTE trends report, conducts the weekly Future Trends Forum, blogs, and runs an online book club. He speaks, consults, and publishes widely. His latest book is Universities on Fire: Higher Education in the Climate Crisis (Johns Hopkins University Press).

Term: Curriculum

Email: bryan.alexander@gmail.com

Website: futureofeducation.us/

Twitter: @bryanalexander

LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/bryannalexander

Facebook: facebook.com/bryannalexander

What is it?

Selecting, vetting, organizing, and distributing effective content.

Why is it important?

The amount of information available to workers is increasing at an exponential rate. Business professionals have neither the time nor the expertise needed to identify the most valuable content from this seemingly endless flow. Curation selects and presents the most useful, valuable content and makes it available so others don’t need to repeat that effort. In his book Curation Nation(Rosenbaum, 2011), Steven Rosenbaum describes it this way: Curation replaces noise with clarity.

Why does a business professional need to know this?

Business professionals should care because curation is emerging as an important competency. In today’s world of work the person who knows everything is no longer the most valuable member of the team; the person who can find and share the answer to anything is.

Museum curators don’t create content. They listen, then find content that resonates. They scour the globe for artifacts related to that content and organize artifacts in such a way that guests are taken on a learning journey as they experience an exhibit. Of course, museum curators are highly trained for doing this. It is their specialty.

Business professionals are finding that curation is an important specialty in their world, too. Curation in the business world starts from the assumption that most questions have already been answered and most problems have already been solved. Curation finds the answers to those questions and the solutions to those problems and makes the results available. Good curation can help your organization and its customers become more efficient both in learning and in everyday operations.

How does curation fit into learning and performance? The most visible form of curation comes from informal learning that takes place on the job through coaching, mentoring, experiences, and sharing. But capturing this type of learning is difficult, because it takes place serendipitously and without documentation. Actively seeking to capture that knowledge and pass it on is valuable both to the company and its employees.

Business professionals can also curate the information they provide to customers to ensure that they do not overwhelm customers with irrelevant information. Curation, as a discipline, can help replace noise with clarity and enable you to deliver solutions faster and more efficiently.

References

  • (Rosenbaum, 2011) Curation Nation : Rosenbaum, Steven. (2011). McGraw-Hill Education. ISBN: 978-0071760393.
  • (Rosenbaum 2011) Innovate — curation!: Rosenbaum, Steven. (2011). TEDxGrandRapids. YouTube video.

About David Kelly

Photo of David Kelly

David Kelly is the CEO of The Learning Guild. Before joining the Guild, David has been a learning and performance consultant and training director for over 20 years. He is a leading voice exploring how technology can be used to enhance training, education, learning, and organizational performance.

Term: Curation

Email: dkelly@elearningguild.com

Website: learningguild.com

Twitter: @LnDDave

LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/lnddave/